Five Australian dietary guidelines for health

woman makes choice between salad and cake
Choose healthy foods

According to the new Australian Dietary Guidelines released today for public consultation poor nutrition is responsible for around 16% of the total burden of disease and is implicated in more than 56% of all deaths in Australia.

The most recent available estimates for the total cost of poor nutrition were more than $5 billion per year, based on 1990 costings. Given that the cost of obesity alone was estimated to be $8.283 billion per year in 2008, the current cost of poor nutrition in Australia is now likely to greatly exceed the 1990 estimates.

Most of the burden of disease due to poor nutrition in Australia is associated with excessive intake of energy-dense and relatively nutrient-poor foods high in energy (kilojoules), saturated fat, added or refined sugars or salt, and/or inadequate intake of nutrient-dense foods, including vegetables, fruit and wholegrain cereals. Deficiency in some nutrients such as iodine, folate, iron and vitamin D is also of concern for some Australians.

Overconsumption of some foods and drinks, leading to excess energy intake and consequent overweight and obesity, is now a key public health problem for Australia. The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased dramatically in Australia over the past 30 years and is now 62% in adults and around 25% in children and adolescents.

These Guidelines summarise the evidence underlying food, diet and health relationships that improve public health outcomes.The Australian Dietary Guidelines have been released today for public consultation.  There are five guidelines.

Click here to read.Australian Dietary Guidelines

Get the guide here:
NHMRC – Australian Guide to Healthy Eating

3 thoughts on “Five Australian dietary guidelines for health

  • The NHMRC have done a fantastic job in a really difficult area. They’ve walked a fine line between giving practical versus overly scientific advice.

    If I had to split hairs, then I would say that there is not enough scientific evidence to say that solid foods that contain added sugars are any more harmful than foods that contain refined starch. They assume that starch, in all forms, does no harm. However, my area of research is in the glycaemic index (GI) and I think that high-GI starch is worse than added sugars.

    In an earlier version, they recommended eating grains, preferably wholegrains, whereas now they are saying eat mostly wholegrains. I would have liked to see them come out a little stronger and say that we really should just be eating wholegrains as there is mounting evidence that refined grains cause harm.

    I am 95 per cent happy with what has been said and think there is some incredibly helpful advice, particularly to those wanting to manage heart disease and diabetes.

  • The NHMRC have done a fantastic job in a really difficult area. They’ve walked a fine line between giving practical versus overly scientific advice.

    If I had to split hairs, then I would say that there is not enough scientific evidence to say that solid foods that contain added sugars are any more harmful than foods that contain refined starch. They assume that starch, in all forms, does no harm. However, my area of research is in the glycaemic index (GI) and I think that high-GI starch is worse than added sugars.

    In an earlier version, they recommended eating grains, preferably wholegrains, whereas now they are saying eat mostly wholegrains. I would have liked to see them come out a little stronger and say that we really should just be eating wholegrains as there is mounting evidence that refined grains cause harm.

    I am 95 per cent happy with what has been said and think there is some incredibly helpful advice, particularly to those wanting to manage heart disease and diabetes.

  • Potatoes are a natural wonder-food rich in potassium, vitamin C, folate and are completely fat and cholesterol free, and with this in mind people should not avoid this healthy vegetable as suggested in new dietary guidelines.

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